Resources: Blog Post

  
March 10, 2015

Ditch the performance review and talk

Picture of Michael CouchThere is an advantage to putting your organization’s strategy ahead of its people, Michael Couch explained at SCNetwork’s last February event.

“We need to know which (jobs) have critical strategic value and then we need to change and refocus and approach our business in a way to address that,” said Michael, an organizational effectiveness consultant. “Not all jobs are the same in an organization. They’re all important, but not all of them have the same impact on driving strategic results.”

Michael recommends looking at the current capabilities found within an organization’s talent and then taking adequate measures to ensure top talent is positioned in critically strategic positions.

“Which roles are we really going to think about that are going to help us drive our strategy?” he asked. “That’s not the type of question that HR often asks.”

Michael suggests analyzing which competencies are required in strategically important roles and then deliberately developing those competencies within the individuals filling key roles.

What is a competency?

Measurable characteristics of a person related to success at work

Competencies allow organizations to do the following:

  • Align talent with strategy – if you don’t get the competencies right, the rest doesn’t matter
  • Integrate talent processes – consistent application of competencies improves talent decisions.

Michael offered the following suggestions when building competencies:

  • Don’t start from scratch
  • Focus on the future
  • Model high potential, high performers
  • Model roles NOT departments and titles
  • Validate against the strategy

Identifying competencies within individuals can be one of the most difficult aspects of this strategy. Micheal suggests a differentiated talent management approach.

“This forced ranking in performance assessment and talent assessment is outdated,” he said. “That’s why I say throw the damn things out and let’s just have good conversations around aligned objectives and goals on a regular basis that doesn’t end up in a number.”

In the video below, Michael looks at how organizations should proceed once it has identified these pools of talent.

How does your organization approach its talent management?
How do you currently assess talent?
Can assessments be useful?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
SCNetwork members can watch the entire session in our library.
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here


Filed under: leadership, recap, strategy, video

Picture of Michael CouchThere is an advantage to putting your organization’s strategy ahead of its people, Michael Couch explained at SCNetwork’s last February event.

“We need to know which (jobs) have critical strategic value and then we need to change and refocus and approach our business in a way to address that,” said Michael, an organizational effectiveness consultant. “Not all jobs are the same in an organization. They’re all important, but not all of them have the same impact on driving strategic results.”

Michael recommends looking at the current capabilities found within an organization’s talent and then taking adequate measures to ensure top talent is positioned in critically strategic positions.

“Which roles are we really going to think about that are going to help us drive our strategy?” he asked. “That’s not the type of question that HR often asks.”

Michael suggests analyzing which competencies are required in strategically important roles and then deliberately developing those competencies within the individuals filling key roles.

What is a competency?

Measurable characteristics of a person related to success at work

Competencies allow organizations to do the following:

  • Align talent with strategy – if you don’t get the competencies right, the rest doesn’t matter
  • Integrate talent processes – consistent application of competencies improves talent decisions.

Michael offered the following suggestions when building competencies:

  • Don’t start from scratch
  • Focus on the future
  • Model high potential, high performers
  • Model roles NOT departments and titles
  • Validate against the strategy

Identifying competencies within individuals can be one of the most difficult aspects of this strategy. Micheal suggests a differentiated talent management approach.

“This forced ranking in performance assessment and talent assessment is outdated,” he said. “That’s why I say throw the damn things out and let’s just have good conversations around aligned objectives and goals on a regular basis that doesn’t end up in a number.”

In the video below, Michael looks at how organizations should proceed once it has identified these pools of talent.

How does your organization approach its talent management?
How do you currently assess talent?
Can assessments be useful?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
SCNetwork members can watch the entire session in our library.
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here


Filed under: leadership, recap, strategy, video
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