Resources: Blog Post

  
March 19, 2015

Sometimes success is letting someone else take the big shot

Ian's Morning Musing image I believe the best basketball player is Lebron James. In fact, an international friend of my son recently extended his stay in Toronto just to see James in person at the Air Canada Centre. Anyone watching the game between our Raptors and the Cleveland Cavaliers saw an amazing performance, not just from the number of points James scored, but the way in which he got his colleagues to engage and contribute.

In joining Cleveland last summer, James realized early in the season that the team was dysfunctional. Basketball shot

“Everyone wants to win, I would hope,” James said. “Would you rather play selfish basketball and lose, or play unselfish basketball and sacrifice and win? So you pick it.”

As remarkable as James is, he alone cannot win championships. He needs contributing team members and adapts to being subservient on any given night.

I’m reminded of a term first popularized in 1970: servant leader. This is someone who focuses primarily on the growth and well-being of people, and the communities to which they belong. Ask yourself how often do you hear a leader ask each of his team members, “What ?do you need from me to be successful?” Chances are your answer is, “Not enough.”

As I think about organizations, departments and teams, the ability to collaborate without concern as to where power and control reside, is central to success. In their new book, Leadership is Half the Story, our March presenters, Marc and Samantha Hurwitz, have recognized that partnerships and followership are equal, dynamic and different.

Whether on a basketball court, or in an office environment, our understanding of the specific challenge and how it should be addressed, is crucial. We need to feel comfortable taking the lead on occasion, and sometimes following another’s lead, depending upon the circumstances. In the CEO/CHRO relationship, I, at times, take the CEO’s lead and run with the plays. On other occasions, I set the direction and tone, and he follows that lead.

LeBron understands that he sets the tone, but others have to align and commit to that leadership path. Followership is not passive. It requires buy-in and guided action. Command and control do not generate followership. As the title of next week’s event suggests, “Leadership is half the story.”

A leader is one who travels the path carved out by him, and he leads himself onward on that path. If his path is good and his goals are desirable, many more may follow him in their desire to achieve the same goal. Hence, followership is the effect of leadership and not its cause.
– Awdhesh Singh

Whether in person, or on the webcast, don’t miss out on this discussion.
Register here


Filed under: followership, leadership, morning musing, upcoming event

Ian's Morning Musing image I believe the best basketball player is Lebron James. In fact, an international friend of my son recently extended his stay in Toronto just to see James in person at the Air Canada Centre. Anyone watching the game between our Raptors and the Cleveland Cavaliers saw an amazing performance, not just from the number of points James scored, but the way in which he got his colleagues to engage and contribute.

In joining Cleveland last summer, James realized early in the season that the team was dysfunctional. Basketball shot

“Everyone wants to win, I would hope,” James said. “Would you rather play selfish basketball and lose, or play unselfish basketball and sacrifice and win? So you pick it.”

As remarkable as James is, he alone cannot win championships. He needs contributing team members and adapts to being subservient on any given night.

I’m reminded of a term first popularized in 1970: servant leader. This is someone who focuses primarily on the growth and well-being of people, and the communities to which they belong. Ask yourself how often do you hear a leader ask each of his team members, “What ?do you need from me to be successful?” Chances are your answer is, “Not enough.”

As I think about organizations, departments and teams, the ability to collaborate without concern as to where power and control reside, is central to success. In their new book, Leadership is Half the Story, our March presenters, Marc and Samantha Hurwitz, have recognized that partnerships and followership are equal, dynamic and different.

Whether on a basketball court, or in an office environment, our understanding of the specific challenge and how it should be addressed, is crucial. We need to feel comfortable taking the lead on occasion, and sometimes following another’s lead, depending upon the circumstances. In the CEO/CHRO relationship, I, at times, take the CEO’s lead and run with the plays. On other occasions, I set the direction and tone, and he follows that lead.

LeBron understands that he sets the tone, but others have to align and commit to that leadership path. Followership is not passive. It requires buy-in and guided action. Command and control do not generate followership. As the title of next week’s event suggests, “Leadership is half the story.”

A leader is one who travels the path carved out by him, and he leads himself onward on that path. If his path is good and his goals are desirable, many more may follow him in their desire to achieve the same goal. Hence, followership is the effect of leadership and not its cause.
– Awdhesh Singh

Whether in person, or on the webcast, don’t miss out on this discussion.
Register here


Filed under: followership, leadership, morning musing, upcoming event
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