Resources: Blog Post

  
April 6, 2015

Be a follower. Everyone’s doing it.

Sam Hurwitz

Developing followership within an organization can yield some of the most impressive improvements in business metrics, Marc Hurwitz told SCNetwork members at our last event.

“Imagine you went to the CEO of an organization that you’re working with and said, ‘I can increase sales, quality of work, revenue per employee, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction – virtually every metric associated with the business from top line to bottom line and everything in between – by 17 to 43 per cent,” Marc said, referencing a study by McKenzie and Podsakoff in Human Performance.

Marc and Samantha Hurwitz recently co-authored Leadership is Half the Story, which they say introduces the first business model that seamlessly integrates followership, leadership and partnerships – or, as they refer to it: FLIP.

“The same person who’s a great leader one moment has to ‘flip’ to being a great follower the next,” Samantha told SCNetwork. “Leadership and followership are dynamic roles that we all do.”

The power of strong followership is not lost on many business leaders, said Marc. A 2009 study in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies asked more than 300 C-suite executives for their perspective on the value of followership:

  • 99.7 per cent believe followership affects work output quality
  • 98.6 per cent believe followership improves work unit performance
  • 96.1 per cent believe followership is more than doing what one is told
  • 95.7 per cent disagree with the claim that everyone knows how to follow

Developing followership should be viewed as a necessary condition for organizational success.”

Dr. Augustin Agho in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies (2009)

“There are also considerable personal outcomes for good followership,” Marc says, highlighting the following personal benefits:

  • More latitude to act
  • More satisfaction with career
  • Faster career progression
  • Better performance (up to 53 per cent)
  • Better performance appraisals (up to 50 per cent)

In the video below, Marc explains how these qualities are influenced by fostering better followership skills.

“Followership often is the F-word of business,” Marc joked with us, pointing out that there are specific followership behaviours that are distinct from leadership behaviours.

The two slides below are from their presentation and show how decision making and creativity core competencies can be interpreted from both leadership and followership perspectives.

Core Competency - Decision MakingCore Competency - Creativity

“From a personal perspective, from a career perspective – and as we mentioned before, even from a job satisfaction perspective – this has a huge impact on everybody,” Marc said.

Marc-Hurwitz

Are you a follower? How does it benefit your team?
Can followers be detrimental to business?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
SCNetwork members can watch the entire session in our library.
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here


Filed under: Uncategorized

Sam Hurwitz

Developing followership within an organization can yield some of the most impressive improvements in business metrics, Marc Hurwitz told SCNetwork members at our last event.

“Imagine you went to the CEO of an organization that you’re working with and said, ‘I can increase sales, quality of work, revenue per employee, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction – virtually every metric associated with the business from top line to bottom line and everything in between – by 17 to 43 per cent,” Marc said, referencing a study by McKenzie and Podsakoff in Human Performance.

Marc and Samantha Hurwitz recently co-authored Leadership is Half the Story, which they say introduces the first business model that seamlessly integrates followership, leadership and partnerships – or, as they refer to it: FLIP.

“The same person who’s a great leader one moment has to ‘flip’ to being a great follower the next,” Samantha told SCNetwork. “Leadership and followership are dynamic roles that we all do.”

The power of strong followership is not lost on many business leaders, said Marc. A 2009 study in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies asked more than 300 C-suite executives for their perspective on the value of followership:

  • 99.7 per cent believe followership affects work output quality
  • 98.6 per cent believe followership improves work unit performance
  • 96.1 per cent believe followership is more than doing what one is told
  • 95.7 per cent disagree with the claim that everyone knows how to follow

Developing followership should be viewed as a necessary condition for organizational success.”

Dr. Augustin Agho in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies (2009)

“There are also considerable personal outcomes for good followership,” Marc says, highlighting the following personal benefits:

  • More latitude to act
  • More satisfaction with career
  • Faster career progression
  • Better performance (up to 53 per cent)
  • Better performance appraisals (up to 50 per cent)

In the video below, Marc explains how these qualities are influenced by fostering better followership skills.

“Followership often is the F-word of business,” Marc joked with us, pointing out that there are specific followership behaviours that are distinct from leadership behaviours.

The two slides below are from their presentation and show how decision making and creativity core competencies can be interpreted from both leadership and followership perspectives.

Core Competency - Decision MakingCore Competency - Creativity

“From a personal perspective, from a career perspective – and as we mentioned before, even from a job satisfaction perspective – this has a huge impact on everybody,” Marc said.

Marc-Hurwitz

Are you a follower? How does it benefit your team?
Can followers be detrimental to business?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
SCNetwork members can watch the entire session in our library.
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here


Filed under: Uncategorized
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