Resources: Blog Post

  
November 6, 2014

Celebrating 35 years of SCNetwork

Healthy-Leader-Healthy-Business

In April, SCNetwork celebrated its 35th anniversary with a full day of programming. Throughout the day, there was a clear message — improving your leadership skills benefits you, it benefits the people you work with, and it has financial benefits for your company.

“Unless we can improve leadership — in other words, improve ourselves, our own human and therefore potentially variable and flawed abilities to motivate, engage and encourage innovation — we will not be able to exceed the limits we impose on organizations by demotivating, disengaging and limiting those who work for and with us.”

- SCN member Dave Crisp in his commentary on the day
in the May issue of Canadian HR Reporter

Our first presenter, psychologist Liz Monroe-Cook, told us to prioritize our wellness. The brain needs sleep, exercise and good nutrition to remain healthy. She also advised considering these habits if you want to be a good leader:

  • Pay more attention
  • Stay humble enough to recognize things that may seem obvious to us are potentially imperfect
  • Maintain a more open mind — ask others to contribute instead of expecting they simply follow orders

Liz said our understandings of these fundamentals are still in such infancy that we are best to remain vigilant, slow down, avoid multitasking when possible and practise healthy lifestyles and mindfulness. These strategies may make aware any possible flawed thinking or, better yet, lead to the discovery of a better idea.

Taking care of business Mission vs. Purpose

Helen Kerr, co-president of Toronto-based KerrSmith Design, demonstrated possible responses to dramatic uncertainties we don’t have the ability to predict effectively.

For example, Laura Dunne, senior vice-president of HR and organizational development at Indigo, shared with us how the book company adapted to sudden change in its retail market.

“We had a moment of epiphany where it really was: We have a purpose and not a mission. And our purpose is to enrich the lives of our customers. And we do that by igniting their passions and unleashing their creativity,” Laura told the crowd.

Helen advises businesses consider setting their overall purpose, instead of specific corporate objectives because they’re too specific and limit processes to goals even after they become outdated. As a result, they may impede instead of supporting change.

She believes purposes have the ability to apply to all levels or areas of a business. They’re also easy to communicate, while leaving flexibility for the adaption of best solutions from those closest to actual customers and action.

Would your business benefit from focussing on its purpose over a mission?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here 


Filed under: Uncategorized

Healthy-Leader-Healthy-Business

In April, SCNetwork celebrated its 35th anniversary with a full day of programming. Throughout the day, there was a clear message — improving your leadership skills benefits you, it benefits the people you work with, and it has financial benefits for your company.

“Unless we can improve leadership — in other words, improve ourselves, our own human and therefore potentially variable and flawed abilities to motivate, engage and encourage innovation — we will not be able to exceed the limits we impose on organizations by demotivating, disengaging and limiting those who work for and with us.”

- SCN member Dave Crisp in his commentary on the day
in the May issue of Canadian HR Reporter

Our first presenter, psychologist Liz Monroe-Cook, told us to prioritize our wellness. The brain needs sleep, exercise and good nutrition to remain healthy. She also advised considering these habits if you want to be a good leader:

  • Pay more attention
  • Stay humble enough to recognize things that may seem obvious to us are potentially imperfect
  • Maintain a more open mind — ask others to contribute instead of expecting they simply follow orders

Liz said our understandings of these fundamentals are still in such infancy that we are best to remain vigilant, slow down, avoid multitasking when possible and practise healthy lifestyles and mindfulness. These strategies may make aware any possible flawed thinking or, better yet, lead to the discovery of a better idea.

Taking care of business Mission vs. Purpose

Helen Kerr, co-president of Toronto-based KerrSmith Design, demonstrated possible responses to dramatic uncertainties we don’t have the ability to predict effectively.

For example, Laura Dunne, senior vice-president of HR and organizational development at Indigo, shared with us how the book company adapted to sudden change in its retail market.

“We had a moment of epiphany where it really was: We have a purpose and not a mission. And our purpose is to enrich the lives of our customers. And we do that by igniting their passions and unleashing their creativity,” Laura told the crowd.

Helen advises businesses consider setting their overall purpose, instead of specific corporate objectives because they’re too specific and limit processes to goals even after they become outdated. As a result, they may impede instead of supporting change.

She believes purposes have the ability to apply to all levels or areas of a business. They’re also easy to communicate, while leaving flexibility for the adaption of best solutions from those closest to actual customers and action.

Would your business benefit from focussing on its purpose over a mission?

Leave your comment on our LinkedIn group here
Not an SCN member? Join the premier association of leaders for leaders here 


Filed under: Uncategorized
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